BICOL-MAN

"Be Cool Man"

Infrastructure & Utilities

Source: http://www.neda5.net/rpfp/infrastructure_utilities.htm

Transportation

The transport sub-sector provides the vital link between people, products and services. The transportation network in the region is a complex system that integrates the four modes of transportation, namely: road, rail, air and water. The complexity of the system is attributed to the geographical location of the component provinces.

Roads

The road density in the region increased from 0.50 km/sq.km. in 1989 to 0.62 km./sq.km. in  2000.  Among the region’s six provinces, only Masbate remained poorly served by road network, while the other provinces had road densities of more than 0.60 km/sq. km, with Camarines Sur having the highest.

The 0.12 km. per sq. km. increase in road density in the region meant an additional 2,254.23 kilometers of constructed/improved roads. Passable year-round, those roads significantly increased and improved the accessibility and mobility of goods and services. Barangay roads, comprising 58% of the region’s total road density, remained as the dominant track for road transport.

The road improvements, which included critical roads and bridges throughout the region, were undertaken through major foreign-assisted projects. These included the following:  (1) Construction of Quirino Highway in Camarines Sur; (2) Rehabilitation of Maharlika Highway (Calauag-Sta.Elena, Sta.Elena-Labo, Labo-Daet, and Daet-Sipocot sections); (3) Masbate Rural Road Network Development Projects (Packages 1 and 2); (4) ADB-funded Mobo-Cataingan Road in Masbate;  (4) road component of Sorsogon IAD Project, and Farm to Market Road Development from the DAR and DA.

By classification, the CY 2000 road network of 10,835.79 kilometers comprised of 2,263.17 kms national roads (20.89%), 1,797.28 kms provincial roads (16.59%), 1,051.21 kms municipal/city roads (9.70%), and  5,724.13 kms barangay roads (52.83%).

Due to insufficient inventory of local roads, information on their surface pavement type was not available.  With regard to national roads, however, some 854 kilometers of their 2,263.17 kms, remained unpaved. Most of those unpaved road sections were in Camarines Sur, particularly in the Caramoan Peninsula, as well as in the island-provinces of Catanduanes and Masbate.

The 2,254.33 kilometer increase in road length over the 11-year period indicated an average increment of 205 kilometers per year, The increase was disaggregated as follows: Barangay roads, 1,865.45 kilometers (21.38%); National roads, 281.17 kilometers (3.22%); Municipality/City roads with 264.86 kilometers (3.04%).  On the other hand, the provincial road component was shortened by 298.68 kilometers (3.24%), which indicated that some of the road sections were converted to National Road to facilitate funding for their maintenance and implementation by the DPWH. The Barangay road inventory, on the other hand, increased as a result of the farm to market roads development implemented by DAR and DA.

Motor Vehicle Registration

On motor vehicle registration, the number of vehicles registered as of CY 2000 totaled 96,001. Motorcycles/Tricycles accounted for more than half of the total. This was attributed to the availability of brands that sold at cheaper prices in the local motorcycle market. By province, Albay and Camarines Sur had the highest number of motor vehicles registered at 29,896 and 33,164, respectively.  From CY 1997 to CY 2000, motor vehicle ownership in the region increased by an average rate of 5.83% annually.  Compared to other regions, Bicol accounted for 2.23% of the total number of registered motor vehicles nationwide.  The National Capital Region was highest at 38.16%.

The railway development and rehabilitation in the region consisted of three major components: 1) the 224 kilometer Mainline South (MLS) from Lucena City to Naga City, 2) 100 kilometers from Naga City to Legaspi City, and 3) study for the Sorsogon Railway Extension project from Camalig, Albay to Matnog, Sorsogon. These components were recommended in the previous RPFP for improvement and development.

The first two railway sections were rehabilitated within the planning period, the former in CY 1995 and the latter in CY 1999. They included the refurbishing of the rolling stocks. The supplementary feasibility study for the Sorsogon Railway Extension project was completed and was already approved/endorsed by the RDC V for financing through the Official Development Assistance.

Notwithstanding the rehabilitation of the PNR MLS, the nagging issues and concerns of the railway transport system centered on the poor condition of the railroad tracks and rolling stocks that often resulted to train derailments and longer travel time as compared to buses covering the same route. The most recent PNR accident was in 2004, which brought about deaths and injuries to train passengers thus forcing the management to indefinitely suspend the PNR operations along the Manila to Legazpi City route. A major reason for the continued deterioration of the PNR MLS is its lack of maintenance.

A current effort to address the woes of the railway system is a Feasibility Study on the rehabilitation of the MLS, which includes the Sorsogon Railway Extension Project. The project was approved and endorsed by the RDC V and is subject for approval by the Investment Coordination Committee (ICC). The proposed project will provide the linkage with the North Rail project that is currently on-going.

Railways

The railway development and rehabilitation in the region consisted of three major components: 1) the 224 kilometer Mainline South (MLS) from Lucena City to Naga City, 2) 100 kilometers from Naga City to Legaspi City, and 3) study for the Sorsogon Railway Extension project from Camalig, Albay to Matnog, Sorsogon. These components were recommended in the previous RPFP for improvement and development.

The first two railway sections were rehabilitated within the planning period, the former in CY 1995 and the latter in CY 1999. They included the refurbishing of the rolling stocks. The supplementary feasibility study for the Sorsogon Railway Extension project was completed and was already approved/endorsed by the RDC V for financing through the Official Development Assistance.

Notwithstanding the rehabilitation of the PNR MLS, the nagging issues and concerns of the railway transport system centered on the poor condition of the railroad tracks and rolling stocks that often resulted to train derailments and longer travel time as compared to buses covering the same route. The most recent PNR accident was in 2004, which brought about deaths and injuries to train passengers thus forcing the management to indefinitely suspend the PNR operations along the Manila to Legazpi City route. A major reason for the continued deterioration of the PNR MLS is its lack of maintenance.

A current effort to address the woes of the railway system is a Feasibility Study on the rehabilitation of the MLS, which includes the Sorsogon Railway Extension Project. The project was approved and endorsed by the RDC V and is subject for approval by the Investment Coordination Committee (ICC). The proposed project will provide the linkage with the North Rail project that is currently on-going.

Airport

The region maintains and operates eight (8) functional airports.  Except for the airports in Bulan and Bacon, in Sorsogon province and that in Daet, Camarines Norte, all other airports in the region cater to commercial flight services. Annex 3.1 shows the region’s airport features and statistics.

Legazpi Airport is the only trunk-line airport in the region. It has landing facilities that can accommodate medium-sized aircraft like the Boeing 737 jets. The Legazpi Airport has navigational constraints, however, that frequently cause cancellation of flights during bad weather. Several airline companies serve the region such as the Philippine Airlines, Air Philippines, Asian Spirit, Laoag Airlines, and Aboitiz Forwarders.

Because of navigational constraints and upon validation of the Feasibility Study conducted by JICA, the existing Legazpi City Airport was recommended for relocation to Barangay Alobo, Daraga, Albay. The Master Plan Study for the New Legazpi Airport was completed by the DOTC-ATO. Its implementation is being proposed for ODA financing.

Two other airports in the region, Pili Airport in Camarines Sur and the Masbate Airport, need major upgrading and capital investment requirements.  The former needs to have its runway reoriented for safer aircraft operation, while the latter airport needs to be relocated to avoid a permanent obstruction along its approach.  The preparation of Feasibility Studies by the DOTC-ATO, addressed at the airports’ improvement, is therefore in order. Similarly, the two other feeder airports in Sorsogon need a study to determine whether to maintain or discontinue their operations.

Ports

The region has 70 existing ports classified into 4 categories, namely: 1) National Ports, managed and operated by the Philippine Ports Authority (PPA), 2) Local Ports, operated by LGU, DOTC-PMO, 3) Fish Ports, operated by either the LGU or BFAR under the DA, and (4) Private ports.

As of CY 2004, there were 9 National Ports. The Base Port is Legaspi City Port, being the site of the Regional Operations of the PPA. The rest are terminal ports, of which the Tabaco City Terminal Port, owing to its strategic location and facilities, is also classified as an International Port. Except for Legaspi City and Jose Panganiban Ports, the rest have RORO ramp facilities. Generally, the physical condition of the national ports in the region needs further improvement and upgrading.  Some of the national ports lack basic facilities such as passenger terminals, warehouses, berthing facilities, and others to accommodate more and larger vessels. The construction of the Pantao Port in Libon Albay is  on-going.

In terms of foreign trade, Tabaco Port takes a major role being the main port of entry in the region.  In CY 2000, the port recorded eleven (11) foreign ship calls with gross registered tonnage (GRT) of 63.090 metric tons of handled cargoes, down by 50% compared to the CY 1999 GRT of 129,770 metric tons.

There are 38 local ports, implemented by the LGU with assistance from the DOTC-PMO Ports. These include 32 municipal ports and six Barangay Ports.  The Fish Ports, operated either by LGU or BFAR under the DA, consist of Municipal and Barangay Fish Ports. At present, there are eight (8) fishing ports, seven of which are municipal fishing ports and one is a barangay fishing port located in Legaspi City.

Water Resources

Some 30 river basins provide an estimated annual runoff of 12,804 MCM of surface water across the region.  Such abundant yield provides the resource for the development of water supply, irrigation, fisheries, hydro-thermal and other uses, like recreation.  The infrastructure elements of water resource development include the facilities for water supply, irrigation, and flood control and drainage.

Groundwater, the other major water resource, has an estimated storage of 22,449 MCM regionwide. Of the regions major river basins, the Bicol River Basin contributes the highest estimated storage while Masbate Island Basin contributes the least.

In terms of water usage, as of December 1999, the water rights granted by NWRB was 96.40 %, which was equivalent to 94,905.74 liters per second (lps).  The irrigation sector was granted the highest, accounting for 94.02 percent of the total grant while the least was for industrial use.

Water Supply

The water supply system in the region includes public and privately-owned water sources for domestic and commercial uses. The public water supply systems are categorized into three service levels, namely:  Levels I, II, and III.

Despite having a large water resource potential, Bicol’s total households that were provided with potable water supply was still low at 66.11 percent . As of 2002, the province of Camarines Sur had the highest household coverage (80.24 percent) while the least served provinces were Camarines Norte (49.88 percent) and Masbate (50.77 percent).

Level I

An average of 31.63 percent of the total households was served. Among the six provinces, Camarines Sur had the highest coverage (49.67 percent).

Level II

An average of 15.43 percent of the total households was served. The province of Catanduanes had the highest service coverage (34.63 percent), mostly sourced from springs. Almost all of the region’s municipalities/cities had this type of water facility.

Level III

An average of 19.04 percent of the region’s total households was served. The province of Albay had the highest systems coverage (25.14 percent), while Masbate had the lowest (3.52 percent).  There were 39 operational water districts strategically located in the urban areas of the region.

Irrigation

Cognizant of the importance of irrigation in achieving food security and sustainable agricultural development, the Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Act (AFMA) of 1997 accorded highest priority to irrigation-related endeavors. Still, the potential benefits from irrigation development in the region has not been fully harnessed. As of 2002, the level of irrigation development remained at only half of the estimated potential irrigable areas of 239,660 hectares. Only 118,541 hectares were irrigated.

About 58% of the estimated irrigable area had communal irrigation systems; 17% had national irrigation systems; and the rest had private irrigation systems.  The province of Camarines Sur shared the highest irrigated area (58.21%), more than the combined irrigated areas of the five (5) other provinces.

The poor performance of the irrigation sector was due to a host of interrelated technical, hydrologic, socio-economic, institutional, environmental and political issues. Essentially, such issues must be properly addressed if the benefits from irrigation development will have to be optimized. In 1989, there were 113,337 hectares of total service area irrigated as compared to 118,541 hectares irrigated in 2002. This meant an increase of just 5,204 hectares or 4.6%.

Flood Control and Drainage

Flood control, drainage and shore protection mitigate the loss of lives and properties within settlement areas and productive agricultural lands from the threats of typhoon-induced floods and tidal surges.

In 1989, some 1,778.365 kilometers of Flood Control and Drainage structures were constructed.  From 1990 to 2003, the mitigation intervention was minimal with only 4.5 kms of flood control and drainage structures erected and a meager 2.3 kms of similar structures rehabilitated. New constructions, however, were done in all the provinces, except Sorsogon. Rehabilitation works such as repair, river dredging, clearing of floodways and other similar activities were also undertaken in the provinces of Albay and Camarines Norte.

On shore protection and seawalls, some 27.731 kilometers were constructed in 1989. From 1989 to 2003, only 500 linear meters were constructed in the provinces of Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Catanduanes, and Masbate.

Financial constraints tended to limit the government’s interventions along this sub-sector. This was reflected in the design of structures (e.g. a low 1:5 year return period) such that the focus was more on flood mitigation rather than on flood control. Also, some structures were poorly constructed resulting to inefficient and ineffective response to the calamity in flood-prone areas. Thus, the need to strengthen disaster preparedness, response and rehabilitation in threatened areas with priority on the formulation of an integrated flood control program by all concerned sectors.

Power/Energy

The energy sector in the region involves power generation, transmission, and electrification.

Power Generation

In 1989, there were only 15 generating units in the region with a total capacity of 335.4 MW.  These improved to 46 generating units in 2000 with an aggregate generating capacity of 512.574 MW. Due to the temporary shutdown of some units in the Tiwi geothermal for rehabilitation, however, the dependable energy was down to only 317.67 MW (61.98 percent).

Coal Development

While coal deposit was identified in the island of Rapu-Rapu, this primary energy source has yet to be developed.

Geothermal Energy Development

Exploration and establishment of geothermal power plants were conducted in Albay and Sorsogon provinces, as follows: (a) Completion of the BacMan II – Unit II (Cawayan), which started operation in 1994; (b) On- going Establishment of BacMan II – Unit II (Bogtong); (c) On-going establishment of BacMan Binary, (d) Initial exploration of Mt. Labo and Bulusan Geothermal Power Plant to establish the extent of the reserve, and (e) evaluation of the feasibility study on the BacMan III, also known as Tanawon.

Hydrothermal Development

The potential sites for hydrothermal development in the region are indicated in Annex 3.7. Of these, four potential sites were identified by the DOE for hydropower generation.

Other Renewable Energy

Efforts were directed toward developing other renewable energy sources for Bicol’s remote areas.  Based on the DOE Renewal Energy Framework Plan, potential sites of ocean development for power generation in Bicol are the Camarines provinces, Batan Island in Albay, and Catanduanes. Wind resource for power generation can also be availed in the provinces of Catanduanes and Masbate. Solar panels have also been installed for missionary electrification in remote areas.

Power Transmission

As of CY 2002, the length of transmission lines (T/L) in the Bicol mainland totaled  1,709.17 Circuit Kilometers (CKM), distributed as follows:  (1) 34.5 KV T/L, connecting the Barit Hydro Plant I Buhi to the Luzon Grid,  0.7% of the total T/L length; ( 2) 69 KV T/L,  24.1%;  (3)  230 KV T/L,   51.7%;   and   (4)  +/-350 KV T/L,  23.5%.

Rural Electrification

As of June 2004, the region attained 100 percent energization of its municipalities or  91.56% of the total barangays. In actual figures, only 293 barangays out of 3,471 remained to be energized. Most of those areas are located in Masbate. In terms of viable areas covered by the Electric Cooperatives, some 3,417 (98.44%) of the total barangays are potential. Out of those potential barangays, 93.01% or 3,178 barangays have been energized or a total of 239 barangays have yet to be energized by the electric cooperatives

Power Distribution

Distribution is similar to transmission, except that the former uses only lower voltage lines that distribute electricity to the end users for residential, commercial and industrial uses.  From the transmission level, a total capacity of 235.97 MVA substations are currently installed in strategic locations in each of the provinces of the Bicol Peninsula.  These substations serve as the primary channels that bring down the voltage level, so that power could be transmitted safely over densely populated areas.  For distribution to the utilities and industry users, they use the 69 KV transmission lines.  However, the substations’ installed capacity of 188.776 MVA (installed capacity = plant factor x substation capacity) is not enough to support the energy demand of 140.63 MW. It is below the normal reserve or twice the demand equivalent to 281.262 MW.  Among the Electric Cooperatives (EC’s) substations, only SORECO II is capable of supporting its maximum load demand while MASELCO substation is under-rated.

From the substations, the electric energy is further trimmed down to a lower level before its distribution to the end users.  The EC’s operate at a voltage of 13.2/7.62 KV line to ground system.  As of December 2001, the region had a total of 7,338.11circuit kilometers of distribution lines.

Systems Loss

The operational efficiency of the ECs is mainly determined from the system losses caused by both the technical and non-technical factors.  As of CY 2001, the average system loss of the ECs was 20.89 percent, higher by 0.81 percent than that of the CY 2002 level. The loss remains more than five percentage points higher than the maximum allowable loss of 15 percent but is lower than 5 percentage points from the penalty system loss of 25 percent.

Among the ECs, only FICELCO met the standard posting of a low system loss of 11.78 percent, down by one percentage-point from the CY 2000 level.  SORECO recorded the highest system loss of 27.33 percent.  Although it went down by 0.41 percent from the CY 2000 level, still it was higher than the penalty systems loss. The other ECs posted system losses of between 17 to 25 percent. ALECO was already within the penalty limits.

Power Rates

At the regional level, the rate increased from P 3.35 KWH from 1991 to P 5.47 KWH in 2000. The high power rates in the region can be attributed to the following factors: a) the cost of electricity generated and purchased; b) the nature of the market served; and c) the efficiency of the cooperatives.

On the cost of electricity, NPC sold power at a uniform rate based on a “One Grid One Price” policy.  As of August 2002, its wholesale price in the Luzon Grid was pegged at P 1.6032/KWH for Utilities Group (i.e. ECs in the region, except SORECO I, had a rate of P 1.785/KWH since it is within the category of Small Utility Group of the NPC) and P 1.4238/KWH for Non-Utilities Group (i.e. GCC).  In spite of this, the average power cost among the ECs still varied from MASELCO’s P 3.45 to FICELCO’s P 3.76 per KWH.

The 1990 MANTECH study on the rationalization of power rates in the Bicol Region showed that the discrepancy in power rates was a function of the service area served by the ECs considering the distribution expenses per KWH sold and the load factors and the presence or absence of large commercial and industrial consumers.  While the efficiency of ECs was also a factor contributing to the selling rate, it was determined by their financial performance and operational efficiency.

Financial Performance

As of December 2001, all electric   cooperatives in the region incurred losses in their operation. For the whole region, the deficit of the cooperatives amounted to P 332 million pesos.  The losses incurred by most of the cooperatives were attributed to the operating cost, depreciation cost, and interest on loans.

Collection Efficiency

As of December 2001, the average collection efficiency of the EC’s rated 91% (Table 3.26).  FICELCO had the highest collection efficiency of 98% while TISELCO (island cooperative of Masbate) had a low 72%.

Communication

The communication services sector facilitates the socio-economic processes.  It provides accessible and affordable information infrastructure and services. In consonance with the national vision, the region has established a regulatory environment conducive to the sustainable growth and development of the information infrastructure and services. It promotes and sustains the environment that fosters a healthy relationship among stakeholders particularly between the service providers and the consumers. The region’s communications facilities cover telephone, broadcast, postal and telegraph services.

Telephone Services

The Telecommunications network covers the following services: 1) Local Exchange Carrier Service, 2) Inter-Exchange Carrier, 3) International Gateway Facility, 4) Radio Mobile, 5) Radio paging Service, 6) Value-Added Service, and 7) Satellite Operators Service.

The region’s Local Exchange Carrier Service showed that in 2002, Bicol had 12 service providers, which covered a total of 135,422 installed capacity and 66,701 subscribed lines or 2.75 telephone density and 1.36 subscribed telephone density.  The situation was a drastic improvement compared to 1989 when there were only seven service providers and a telephone density of 0.037.

The other components of telecommunication services consisted of: a) Inter-Exchange Carrier Operations served by six (6) operators, b) International Gateway Facility served by five (5) operators, c) Radio Mobile served by 3 Cellular Mobile Telephone System and one (1) Public Trunk Repeater Services, d) Radio Paging Service served by Smart Communication Incorporated, and e) Satellite Operators served by five (5) service providers. These services offered the rural areas in the Bicol Region the accessibility through domestic and international Cellular Mobile Telephone System (CMTS). Cellular phone users can now place calls to the remotest parts of the region. Smart and Globe compete as the dominant CMTS providers in the region.

In terms of capacity/telephones lines, total connections, and telephone density by province in 1994 and 1998, Albay ranked first and Masbate, last.

There were fourteen (14) telephone service players in the region, consisting of 13 private operators and one government-operated (TELOF).  With the liberalization of the telecommunications industry, the telephone density increased from 0.037 in 1989 to 2.75 per 1000 population in 2002. The accessibility and availability of telephone lines also increased from a density of 2.35 lines per 1,000 population to 2.39. That corresponded to 111,354 lines and 57,797 connections.

Broadcast and CATV Industries

The Nationwide broadcast stations and CATV network as of December 2003 comprised of 2,647 providers.  The Region V component represents 9.33% of the total or 247 providers.

Postal Facilities and Services

From 1989 to 2002, the total number of postal facilities in the region considerably reduced by 10%, from a total of 174 to 156 postal offices and stations

The reduction was the initial step made to keep the Postal Corporation operationally viable as a result of tough competition from the CMTS. Further, Bicol’s Philpost operational area was clustered into four districts.

Postal operations in the late 90’s covered mainly mail volumes posted/delivered and money orders issued/ paid.  The current postal operations cover various postal activities to make the Corporation viable with some considerable decrease in its revenue-generating products and services. Remarkably, Philpost V increased its 2002 revenue over that of 2001  through intensive marketing of postal products and services that were not affected by the advancement in communications technology.  These involved postal products and services such as: 1) Postal IDs, 2) Philatelic Stamps, 3) COD Commissions, 4) 3rd class mails, 5) M-BAGS, 6) Presentation to Customs Fees, 7) Postage Charge Account, 8) Metered Machine Stamps. Despite stiff competition from the CMTS, the corporation increased its revenues by 0.17% in 2002. It also attained 89.61% of the target revenues. However, the total revenue generated was only one-third of the total current operating expenditures of the Corporation.  Philpost V needs to concentrate more on income generating activities and to trim down its organizational structure to the desired level of viability.

Facilities and Services

In 1989, the TELOF under the Department of Transportation and Communication (DOTC), operated a total of 146 telecommunication facilities, broken down as follows  :  1) 6 units Teletype, 2) 67 units landline, 3) 64 units Radio HF/CW, and 4) 9 units Radio VHF.   These constituted a service ratio of .037 per 1000 population, which was very low.

The TELOF operations and services covered four areas: 1) Telegraph services, 2) Telegraphic transfer, 3) Social telegram, and 4) telephone services (Annex 3.12). In 2001, TELOF operated a total of 122 telegraph stations but these decreased to 113 telegraph stations in 2002.  The reduction was caused by the entry of the cellular phone industry, whose carriers (Globe and Smart) installed cells sites in different areas in the region. On the other hand, the telegraphic transfer stations also went down from 59 to 58 telegraphic stations. The three TELOF telephone exchanges (Ligao, Ragay, and Canaman/Camaligan) increased their switching capacity from 844 in 2001 to 992 in 2002. Their total number of subscribers, however, slightly diminished from 582 to 551 for the period 2001-2002. The decrease was attributed to the transfer of subscribers to private telephone companies and to the extensive use of CMTS.

During the period 2001 to 2002, TELOF operations showed that its volume of activities handled decreased, except for the relayed messages which increased by about 41.86%. Nevertheless, its total revenue increased by 16.86%.

Social Infrastructure

Social infrastructure provides the facilities for education, health, other public buildings and solid waste management facilities. The efficient provision of such facilities, contributes to the region’s economic development, that is, the level of service to the people especially in the rural areas of the region.

Schools

The schools in the region fall within the category of any of the following four (4) educational levels: Pre-Elementary, Elementary, Secondary, and Tertiary. As of 2002, there were 4,259 schools in the region.

Pre – Elementary School

There were 231 pre-elementary schools in the region, representing 5.4% of the total, of which 77% are public pre-elementary schools and 33% are privately operated.

Elementary Schools

There were 3,239 elementary schools in the region, representing 76.1 % of the total. Majority were Public elementary schools (94%), while only 6% were private elementary schools.

Secondary Schools

There were 657 secondary schools in the region, representing 15.43% of the total schools in the region.  Of this total, 77% or 508 schools were public and 33% were private.

Tertiary School

The tertiary schools represented 3.10% or 132 schools in the region. These were dominantly private (64% or 85 schools), and only 36% were public. Among the 6 provinces, Albay and Camarines Sur shared the highest number with 26 and 25 tertiary schools, respectively, while Catanduanes had the least with only four (4) tertiary schools. Of the 47 public tertiary schools, 9 were State Universities and Colleges (SUCs) encompassing a total of 32 campuses.

Classrooms

The classrooms for consideration are the public elementary and secondary schools.

Elementary School Classrooms

As of CY 2000, there were 27,240 classrooms in the region. The status of provision of elementary school classrooms is as follows; a) 14,167 (52%) were repairable and usable, b) 3,141 needed immediate replacement, c) 9,932 were in good condition, and d) 2,818 classrooms were still needed to meet the enrollment requirements.

Secondary Schools Classrooms

As of CY 2000, there were 6,160 secondary classrooms in the region. The status of provision of secondary school classrooms is as follows; a) 1,788 classrooms (29%) were repairable, b) 542 classrooms needed immediate repair, c) 3,839 classrooms were in good condition, d) 1,712 classrooms were still needed to meet the enrollment requirements.

Health Facilities

The health facilities in the region are served by both government and private entities.  Currently, there are 136 hospitals in the region, of which 85 hospitals are operated by private institution and 51 hospitals are operated by the government.  These include 137 Municipal Health Centers (MHCs), and 1,045 Barangay Health Stations (BHS).

Generally, the provision of health facilities in the region remains inadequate particularly at the barangay level where basic health care is most needed. Of the total barangays in the region, only 30% are served with Barangay Health Stations (BHS). At the municipal level, municipal health centers are in place. On the other hand, the bed occupancy rate in public hospitals is high, which indicates inadequate bed capacity, e.g., the Bicol Regional Training and Teaching Hospital (BRTTH) had a bed occupancy rate of 118%. Likewise, medical equipment, facilities and medical manpower are inadequate.

Building Facilities

The building facilities in the region are classified into National, Provincial, City, and Municipal buildings. An inventory conducted in 2002 showed that the region had a total of 470 buildings.

Solid Waste Management Facilities

The open dumping method of solid waste disposal practiced by some LGUs had resulted into adverse environmental impact, which led to the passage of DENR Administrative Order 98-49 and 98-50 advocating for the adoption of the sanitary landfill method. The directive also required LGUs to upgrade their existing open dumpsites. Based on the ratio of 2.60 hectares per 100,000 persons (adopted by the Presidential Task Force on Waste Management to project the land requirement), the region will need 145 hectares by year 2010, 162 hectares by 2020, and 177 hectares by 2030.

Source: http://www.neda5.net/rpfp/infrastructure_utilities.htm

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: